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The Other Side of the Wall is the debut novel by Andrea Mara, a Dublin based freelance writer and award-winning blogger (OfficeMum.ie). Andrea worked for 17 years in Dublin s IFSC before moving into freelance writing now she writes lifestyle features for Irish newspapers, magazines, and websites. A wall is a perennial reality, especially when it is made of stone and steel, when the matter of which it is composed is that used in the great constructions — in that sense, to carry out an ephemeral operation using the matter of eternity can only have an ironic connotation, or originate from an assertion of power. Millenium International Documentary Film Festival Du 20 au 30 mars 2018Follow us on:http://www.festivalmillenium.orghttps://www.facebook.com/MilleniumFilmFes. PDF Drive is your search engine for PDF files. As of today we have 80,396,044 eBooks for you to download for free. No annoying ads, no download limits, enjoy it and don't forget to bookmark and share the love!

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The Other Side Of The Wall PDF Free Download
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The Other Side Of The Wall Pdf Free Download 64 Bit

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The Other Side Of The Wall PDF Free Download

A wall is a boundary, a fence, a barrier to body and eye. It is also a boundary that demarcates fields, a borderline. Walls are built from the ground up because it is in their nature to rise from the ground and implement their function as obstacle and visual limit. Walls are authoritarian because they hinder circulation; they are signs of finitude. Finally, walls are like sculptures: they have the same funerary charge, the same compulsion to move our body, which has to skirt the wall, to size it up, to measure it. You could also say that walls are like architectures. Better still, they are the origin of any architecture; they are architectural protomodels, as if architecture were descending to a level where what matters is the cumulative gesture, whereby one is placed on top of the other; the addition of one more layer that will determine a height, a relation with the ground (with the territory) or with the space, or with the body. There are many different walls: the ones delimiting a field, the ones rising before us like a border, the ones you can easily jump over, the ones that are organized in a matrix, the ones you call a rampart, the ones resulting from a more or less random piling up of things over time, the ones designed with an architect’s sophistication, false walls be-cause they are mere political borders, real walls that are also political borders, Berlin walls, Palestinian walls, social walls, virtual walls, and the wall of Antonio Bolota.
Antonio Bolota’s wall is false. Rather, it is genuinely false. By this I mean to say that it is a wall that respects aesthetic, ethical, cognitive, affective and social conventions inside an art gallery. From a technical and aesthetic perspective, it is highly complex: it is a suspended wall, built by placing one stone on top of another, supported by a steel girder embedded in the wall, functioning as a partition in the exhibition space. In terms of construction, it is a familiar wall to anyone who has spent some time in the Caramulo woods and the Beiras. It is an accumulation of stones, piled up and kept together only by their weight. It is a wall that does not give in to architecture, because the space that it divides is a representational space, and in that sense it is a wall that represents its own presence, emphasized by its ecstatic levitation: removed from the floor, standing on the girder that raises it, this wall speaks of its physical condition of weight; it speaks of its gravity from a great effort of imponderability. The overcoming of gravity is one of the characteristics of Bolota’s work, and it is also one of the fundamental components of the history of sculpture from the moment when it broke free of the history of statuary, when it created one of the greatest separations in modernity: in the first place, abandoning the plinth; secondly, leaving behind anthropomorphism; and thirdly, becoming completely figurative in order to assert itself as an intention beyond representation. This paradox (or rather, this oxymoron) found many lines of action in modern sculpture: with Rodin, Giacometti, Tony Smith, or Richard Serra, a possible means was established by which sculpture was rendered legitimate on the basis of its mass, rather than as a sculptural object. In other words, legitimacy is attained through gravity, from the force of attraction between the objects and the ground, or the earth. This has been Antonio Bolota’s field of action in at least two different ways: he situates his work as an intervention in the presence of forces that are greater than us (gravity, the balance of bodies, mass), and, at the same time, as a subtle intervention that makes use of resources by which these forces can be manipulated (engineering), thus establishing a poetics of space and of the bodies that move in it. Of particular interest is the fact that there are two seemingly contradictory statements in the enormous power of his sculp-tures: on the one hand, there is the assertion of a corporeality that identifies them as sculptures, because their solidity superimposes itself on the fragility of the body; on the other hand, they possess the ability to make the body facing them find its own sublimity in the face of the disquieting instability of its contradictions. A polyhedron dropping from the heights and almost touching the ground with great delicacy; a house moving around its axis and revealing the gap between the structure of the space and the way that you experience it; the tension of a weight on an axis. And finally, a tension between a detail and the whole, between the force that governs us — all of us, inexorably — and the audacity that is the humanist belief in individuality. One could compare Bolota’s sculpture to an idea of individuality, of the one against the world, against the forces of nature or against the rule, which is the core of great cinema. One could also imagine exactly the opposite: that it is all about bringing to the surface the possibility of being paradoxical that is provided by the physical laws, because their performance can always tolerate an opposing force, and that is the nature of the world. In this sense, his sculptures possess an epic resonance, like a confrontation with a great force, an overlapping of the great art of manipulation, a sleight of hand around the performance of strength and resistance, attraction between bodies, heaviness and lightness. His wall is thus a contradiction in terms, like an impediment that brings to the surface the nature of the boundary, because in floating it displays its weight. It is a romantic wall, not only because it asserts its opposite, but also because, at the same time, it reaffirms itself; contradictory, useless and determining in the way it hinders our eye, our steps, and the rational perception of forces. Ultimately, Antonio Bolota’s wall operates over time. A wall is a perennial reality, especially when it is made of stone and steel, when the matter of which it is composed is that used in the great constructions — in that sense, to carry out an ephemeral operation using the matter of eternity can only have an ironic connotation, or originate from an assertion of power. I don’t believe that either one is the source of his motivation: maybe it is the assertion of ars before art, as a technique that reveals something. Maybe it is a fascination with the power of the individual in the face of great forces, or his ability to play with them. Maybe it is the ability to establish a poetics based on the subversion of brutality. Maybe it is all of the above. What I know is this: his wall is a physical assertion of the power that sculpture has to act on the body, to render it fragile and to make it recognize its fragility, to situate itself in a paradoxical time, between the ephemeral nature of experience and the futility of grandiloquence, to bring the weight to the surface and produce the experience of corporeality. This is the field where matter, cognition and sensation intertwine with prestidigitation. And there we stand, still, before it.

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